Differential diagnosis

00:00

  • Differential diagnosis
According to the acronym ABCDE you found out this,
A: Clear, unobstructed airways.
B: Sufficiently spontaneous breathing, weakend on the left side for tenderness of the lower ribs, patient presented with rib crepitation on the left side and subcutaneous emphysema.
C: Stable circulation, capillary refill time < 2 s, pelvis fixed, long bones without trauma, abdomen is stiff, peristalsis inaudible.
D: GCS 14, patient responds to verbal stimuli, corneal reflex is present, isocoric pupils.
E: small scratches on the upper limbs. What could be life-threatening for the patient?

Left side pneumothorax.

Wrong answer

Well done. However, the patient is primarily not at risk of tension pneumothorax. Tension pneumothorax would have been resolved on the spot. This patient breathes spontaneously, bilaterally, oxygen saturation does not drop, the circulation is stable.


Back

Intracranial haemorrhage.

Wrong answer

According to the examination of the patient you do not consider intracranial haemorrhage. Patient communicates, he is conscious and his GCS score is 14.


Back

Intrabdominal bleeding, suspicious spleen rupture.

Correct answer

Well done. Due to the mechanism of injury and based on the examination, abdominal organ injury, or bleeding into the cavity can not be excluded. Young healthy male do not have to suffer from circulation changes from blood loss up to 15 %.


Continue

?

Help

GCS (The Glasgow Coma Scale is the most common scoring system used to describe the level of consciousness in a person following a traumatic brain injury)×
 
RR

16 bpm

HR

76 bpm

SpO2

97 %

BP

150/80 mmHg

ECG

not available

 

Gly

not available

ABG

not available

CBC

not available

biochemistry

not available